Wednesday, 20 September 2017

From The Liberty Wall – St George’s Committee Debate (5) – What Dangers Do We Face?
ST. GEORGE’S DAY – 23rd April – is only a few weeks away. It’s therefore fairly appropriate for the National Liberal Party to highlight the latest St. George’s Committee debate. This debate (posted up on their Facebook page https://www.facebook.com/
stgeorgescommittee/?fref=ts&ref=br_tf towards the middle of March) looked at three main threats to English identity and culture.

According to the St. George’s Committee ‘they are – in no particular order – the confusion between being English or British, mass immigration and the negative effects of US consumer culture’.

It’s probably true to say that mass immigration is more visible than the other listed threats. However, it could be argued that the greatest threat to English identity and culture is that posed by US consumer culture.

This is because it reduces everyone – irrespective of race, ethnicity or religion – to a consumerist drone. People lose all sense of their real identity and become slaves to US corporations instead.

St George’s Committee Debate (5) – What Dangers Do We Face?

AS WE’VE pointed out many times before, the St. George’s Committee is a cultural organisation. Indeed, we are an Anglo-centric movement in that we wish to preserve, protect and promote English history, heritage, traditions, identity and culture.

Whilst we are strictly non-political, we recognise that there is a strong link between culture and politics. If the politicians in Westminster and/or the European Union pass laws that relate to English culture, we have a right and a duty to discuss them.

With this in mind, we’d like to ask our supporters to debate what the main dangers to English culture are.

We feel that there are three main dangers. They are – in no particular order – the confusion between being English or British, mass immigration and the negative effects of US consumer culture.

As we mentioned earlier, the St. George’s Committee is an Anglo-centric movement. We are proud to be English. We may not agree with everything that has been done in our name but, on the whole, we are proud of our English history, heritage, traditions, identity and culture.

We feel that we are a distinct people. Our Anglo-Saxon roots mean that we are different from the rest of those who inhabit the British Isles. However, there is still massive confusion between being English and being British. Why is this?

We also feel that mass immigration presents a danger to English culture. Like Welsh cultural activists – who understandably want a Welsh Wales – we English cultural activists want an English England. This outlook is not based or hatred. It is shared by indigenous peoples the world over.

How many immigrants (each with a culture of their own) can England absorb before English culture suffers? What happens when an aspect of one culture clashed with another? The current massive population shift from the Middle East into Europe brings this into sharp focus.

Finally, we feel that the influence of US consumer culture has had a massive – and detrimental effect – on English culture. But what is US consumer culture and why is it so powerful? This definition – from the Houston Chronicle http://smallbusiness.chron.com/consumer-culture-57886.html – is fairly succinct:

‘Consumer culture is a form of capitalism in which the economy is focused on the selling of consumer goods and the spending of consumer money. Most economists agree that the United States is a consumer culture. A significant part of consumer culture is an emphasis on lifestyle and using material goods to attain happiness and satisfaction. Businesses large and small can capitalize by focusing their marketing on this culture.’

Given that the vast majority of English cultural activists appear to be from a lower or middle income background, how do we halt this (seemingly unstoppable) force of Globalism?

We hope to cover these threats to English culture in greater detail in later debates. For now, however, we’d be interested in your initial thoughts.

• THIS ARTICLE should be read in conjunction with the following:
St. George’s Committee Debate (1) – How Do We Promote English History, Heritage, Traditions, Identity & Culture? (19/07/2013) http://nationalliberal.org/from-the-liberty-wall-%e2%80%93-st-george%e2%80%99s-committee-debate-1-%e2%80%93-how-do-we-promote-english-history-heritage-traditions-identity-culture
St. George’s Committee Debate (2) – Why Does The Establishment Hate The English? (29/10/2013) http://nationalliberal.org/from-the-liberty-wall-%e2%80%93-st-george%e2%80%99s-committee-debate-2-%e2%80%93-why-does-the-establishment-hate-the-english
St. George’s Committee Debate (3) – Is Anglophobia A Form Of Racism? (01/05/2015) http://nationalliberal.org/from-the-liberty-wall-st-george%e2%80%99s-committee-debate-3-%e2%80%93-is-anglophobia-a-form-of-racism
St. George’s Committee Debate (4) – Can English Culture Survive Under Westminster Rule? (27/11/15) http://nationalliberal.org/from-the-liberty-wall-%e2%80%93-st-george%e2%80%99s-committee-debate-4-%e2%80%93-can-english-culture-survive-under-westminster-rule
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